AERONAUT DESIGN CO.

AERONAUT DESIGN CO.

AERONAUT DESIGN CO.

AERONAUT DESIGN CO.

AERONAUT DESIGN COMPANY is my venture into the niche apparel and merchandise space, catering to aviation & space enthusiasts. Taking my design skills and childhood passion for flight into the wild blue yonder of design entrepreneurship, I've created the brand with the purpose of creating products that my fellow flight lovers will enjoy as much as I do creating them.

To peek behind the design, keep scrolling!

or...

AERONAUT DESIGN COMPANY is my new venture into the niche apparel and merchandise space, catering to aviation & space enthusiasts. Taking my design skills and childhood passion for flight into the wild blue yonder of design entrepreneurship, I've created the brand with the purpose of creating products that my fellow flight lovers will enjoy as much as I do creating them.

To peek behind the design,
keep scrolling!

or...

AERONAUT DESIGN COMPANY is my new venture into the niche apparel and merchandise space, catering to aviation & space enthusiasts. Taking my design skills and childhood passion for flight into the wild blue yonder of design entrepreneurship, I've created the brand with the purpose of creating products that my fellow flight lovers will enjoy as much as I do creating them.

To peek behind the design,
keep scrolling!

or...

AERONAUT DESIGN COMPANY is my new venture into the niche apparel and merchandise space, catering to aviation & space enthusiasts. Taking my design skills and childhood passion for flight into the wild blue yonder of design entrepreneurship, I've created the brand with the purpose of creating products that my fellow flight lovers will enjoy as much as I do creating them.

To peek behind the design, keep scrolling!
or...

AERONAUT DESIGN COMPANY is my new venture into the niche apparel and merchandise space, catering to aviation & space enthusiasts. I've created the brand with the purpose of creating products that my fellow flight lovers will enjoy as much as I do creating them.

To peek behind the design, keep scrolling!
or...

DISCIPLINE
» Brand Strategy
» Naming
» Logo & Identity Design
» Illustration
» Marketing

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ADC COASTER

CREATING A BRAND

CREATING A BRAND

CREATING A BRAND

CREATING A BRAND

In 2019, I chose to take a step back and take some advice I had heard not too long ago about success and finding your true purpose. To paraphrase: rediscover your true childhood passion and merge it with your marketable skills. This is something other designers had done with success; making money creating awesome things that they wish existed.

So, I rediscovered my original passion for flight, which had been put on hiatus while I was in design school, by digging out my old books, models, and documentaries about flight. While also doing market research, I discovered there was opportunity in the aviation apparel and goods market. After reading the pulse of current design trends and tastes, I found my art style and the niche I was shooting for to be compatible.

Before doing any work, I had to get my thoughts down on paper and define this thing I was going to create, to see if I could pull it off. When everything started to come into focus, I began work on the visual side. At the same time, I got help creating a business plan from my Mom. Mom's are the best!

In 2019, I chose to take a step back and take some advice I had heard not too long ago about success and finding your true purpose. To paraphrase: rediscover your true childhood passion and merge it with your marketable skills. This is something other designers had done with success; making money creating awesome things that they wish existed.

So, I rediscovered my original passion for flight, which had been put on hiatus while I was in design school, by digging out my old books, models, and documentaries about flight. While also doing market research, I discovered there was opportunity in the aviation apparel and goods market. After reading the pulse of current design trends and tastes, I found my art style and the niche I was shooting for to be compatible.

Before doing any work though, I had to get my thoughts down on paper and define this thing I was going to create, to see if I could pull it off. When everything started to come into focus, I began work on the visual side. At the same time, I got help creating a business plan from my Mom. Mom's are the best!

In 2019, I chose to step back and take some advice I had heard not too long ago about success and finding your true purpose. To paraphrase: rediscover your true childhood passion and merge it with your marketable skills. This is something other designers had done with success; making money creating awesome things that they wish existed.

So, I rediscovered my original passion for flight, which had been put on hiatus while I was in design school, by digging out my old books, models, and documentaries about flight. While also doing market research, I discovered there was opportunity in the aviation apparel and goods market. After reading the pulse of current design trends and tastes, I found my art style and the niche I was shooting for to be compatible.

Before doing any work though, I had to get my thoughts down on paper and define this thing I was going to create, to see if I could pull it off. When everything started to come into focus, I began work on the visual side. At the same time, I got help creating a business plan from my Mom. Mom's are the best!

In 2019, I chose to step back and take some advice I had heard not too long ago about success and finding your true purpose. To paraphrase: rediscover your true childhood passion and merge it with your marketable skills. This is something other designers had done with success; making money creating awesome things that they wish existed.

So, I rediscovered my original passion for flight, which had been put on hiatus while I was in design school, by digging out my old books, models, and documentaries about flight. While also doing market research, I discovered there was opportunity in the aviation apparel and goods market. After reading the pulse of current design trends and tastes, I found my art style and the niche I was shooting for to be compatible.

Before doing any work though, I had to get my thoughts down on paper and define this thing I was going to create, to see if I could pull it off. When everything started to come into focus, I began work on the visual side. At the same time, I got help creating a business plan from my Mom. Mom's are the best!

In 2019, I chose to step back and take some advice I had heard not too long ago about success and finding your true purpose. To paraphrase: rediscover your true childhood passion and merge it with your marketable skills. This is something other designers had done with success; making money creating awesome things that they wish existed.

So, I rediscovered my original passion for flight, which had been put on hiatus while I was in design school, by digging out my old books, models, and documentaries about flight. While also doing market research, I discovered there was opportunity in the aviation apparel and goods market. After reading the pulse of current design trends and tastes, I found my art style and the niche I was shooting for to be compatible.

Before doing any work though, I had to get my thoughts down on paper and define this thing I was going to create, to see if I could pull it off. When everything started to come into focus, I began work on the visual side. At the same time, I got help creating a business plan from my Mom. Mom's are the best!

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THE SKETCHBOOK: AN INDESPENSIBLE TOOL

LOGO DESIGN PROCESS

LOGO DESIGN PROCESS

LOGO DESIGN PROCESS

LOGO DESIGN PROCESS

Aeronaut Design Co is all about promoting the fun of flying, so if I wanted my brand to be authentic, my logo needed to be simple, fun, and energetic. Like a plane taking off! I was inspired by logos and lettering from industrial 20th century America, especially the dead logos from the beginning years of aviation, back when aircraft giants like Boeing were still small.

After doing lots of research and tons of explorations and sketches, I found the best solution was a stylized “A” monogram with a plane's flight path creating the crossbar. Many of the concepts were great, but of all the sketches, the plane monogram was the most practical. It had the benefit of being readable at micro sizes due to no loss of contrast, easily turned into a stencil, and was circular — perfect for online profiles and seals. Additionally, since it was a perfect circle, the logo had the flexibility to be in several different type lockups, from stacked, horizontal, emblem, and more.

In my experience as a logo designer, logos today not only have to be flexible across many sizes and mediums, but also "bulletproof". Meaning, readable as a blurry black and white image on a crappy copier, a one color vector shape for laser etching, a stamp, watermark, the list could go on. You never know what a logo will be used for down the road. I think my logo succeeded not only in this capacity, but I can see it stretching further — even broken apart and animated, which is something logos are required to be able to do more and more. I even plan on that plane showing up in other parts of the identity, kind of like a mascot. What fun!

Aeronaut Design Co is all about promoting the fun of flying, so if I wanted my brand to be authentic, my logo needed to be simple, fun, and energetic. Like a plane taking off! I was inspired by logos and lettering from industrial 20th century America, especially the dead logos from the beginning years of aviation, back when aircraft giants like Boeing were still small.

After doing lots of research and tons of explorations and sketches, I found the best solution was a stylized “A” monogram with a plane's flight path creating the crossbar. Many of the concepts were great, but of all the sketches, the plane monogram was the most practical. It had the benefit of being readable at micro sizes due to no loss of contrast, easily turned into a stencil, and was circular — perfect for online profiles and seals. Additionally, since it was a perfect circle, the logo had the flexibility to be in several different type lockups, from stacked, horizontal, emblem, and more.

In my experience as a logo designer, logos today not only have to be flexible across many sizes and mediums, but also "bulletproof". Meaning, readable as a blurry black and white image on a crappy copier, a one color vector shape for laser etching, a stamp, watermark, the list could go on. You never know what a logo will be used for down the road. I think my logo succeeded not only in this capacity, but I can see it stretching further — even broken apart and animated, which is something logos are required to be able to do more and more. I even plan on that plane showing up in other parts of the identity, kind of like a mascot. What fun!

Aeronaut Design Co is all about promoting the fun of flying, so if I wanted my brand to be authentic, my logo needed to be simple, fun, and energetic. Like a plane taking off! I was inspired by logos and lettering from industrial 20th century America, especially the dead logos from the beginning years of aviation, back when aircraft giants like Boeing were still small.

After doing lots of research and tons of explorations and sketches, I found the best solution was a stylized “A” monogram with a plane's flight path creating the crossbar. Many of the concepts were great, but of all the sketches, the plane monogram was the most practical. It had the benefit of being readable at micro sizes due to no loss of contrast, easily turned into a stencil, and was circular — perfect for online profiles and seals. Additionally, since it was a perfect circle, the logo had the flexibility to be in several different type lockups, from stacked, horizontal, emblem, and more.

In my experience as a logo designer, logos today not only have to be flexible across many sizes and mediums, but also "bulletproof". Meaning, readable as a blurry black and white image on a crappy copier, a one color vector shape for laser etching, a stamp, watermark, the list could go on. You never know what a logo will be used for down the road. I think my logo succeeded not only in this capacity, but I can see it stretching further — even broken apart and animated, which is something logos are required to be able to do more and more. I even plan on that plane showing up in other parts of the identity, like a mascot. What fun!

Aeronaut Design Co is all about promoting the fun of flying, so if I wanted my brand to be authentic, my logo needed to be simple, fun, and energetic. Like a plane taking off! I was inspired by logos and lettering from industrial 20th century America, especially the dead logos from the beginning years of aviation, back when aircraft giants like Boeing were still small.

After doing lots of research and tons of explorations and sketches, I found the best solution was a stylized “A” monogram with a plane's flight path creating the crossbar. Many of the concepts were great, but of all the sketches, the plane monogram was the most practical. It had the benefit of being readable at micro sizes due to no loss of contrast, easily turned into a stencil, and was circular — perfect for online profiles and seals. Additionally, since it was a perfect circle, the logo had the flexibility to be in several different type lockups, from stacked, horizontal, emblem, and more.

In my experience as a logo designer, logos today not only have to be flexible across many sizes and mediums, but also "bulletproof". Meaning, readable as a blurry black and white image on a crappy copier, a one color vector shape for laser etching, a stamp, watermark, the list could go on. You never know what a logo will be used for down the road. I think my logo succeeded not only in this capacity, but I can see it stretching further — even broken apart and animated, which is something logos are required to be able to do more and more. I even plan on that plane showing up in other parts of the identity, kind of like a mascot. What fun!

Aeronaut Design Co is all about promoting the fun of flying, so if I wanted my brand to be authentic, my logo needed to be simple, fun, and energetic. Like a plane taking off! I was inspired by logos and lettering from industrial 20th century America, especially the dead logos from the beginning years of aviation, back when aircraft giants like Boeing were still small.

After doing lots of research and tons of explorations and sketches, I found the best solution was a stylized “A” monogram with a plane's flight path creating the crossbar. Many of the concepts were great, but of all the sketches, the plane monogram was the most practical. It had the benefit of being readable at micro sizes due to no loss of contrast, easily turned into a stencil, and was circular — perfect for online profiles and seals. Additionally, since it was a perfect circle, the logo had the flexibility to be in several different type lockups, from stacked, horizontal, emblem, and more.

In my experience as a logo designer, logos today not only have to be flexible across many sizes and mediums, but also "bulletproof". Meaning, readable as a blurry black and white image on a crappy copier, a one color vector shape for laser etching, a stamp, watermark, the list could go on. You never know what a logo will be used for down the road. I think my logo succeeded not only in this capacity, but I can see it stretching further — even broken apart and animated, which is something logos are required to be able to do more and more. I even plan on that plane showing up in other parts of the identity, kind of like a mascot. What fun!

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JUST A FEW OF MANY

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SEAL LOGO & AIRCRAFT SKETCHES

A FLEXIBLE IDENTITY

A FLEXIBLE IDENTITY

A FLEXIBLE IDENTITY

A FLEXIBLE IDENTITY

Since I have full control over the brand, I wanted to give myself some real type and logo flexibility. As long as the flavor was consistent with my brand, I gave myself the freedom to change up typeface and logo lockups. However, I did start with one primary body typeface (Aerojost) and display font (VoyageCulture) that I could fall back on. It's so freeing to not have to be constrained to one or two typefaces or logos! To manage this balance between consistency and flexibility, I quickly created a brand guide with a long list of usable typefaces into a desktop wallpaper size image.

Since I have full control over the brand, I wanted to give myself some real type and logo flexibility. As long as the flavor was consistent with my brand, I gave myself the freedom to change up typeface and logo lockups. However, I did start with one primary body typeface (Aerojost) and display font (VoyageCulture) that I could fall back on. It's so freeing to not have to be constrained to one or two typefaces or logos! To manage this balance between consistency and flexibility, I quickly created a brand guide with a long list of usable typefaces into a desktop wallpaper size image.

Since I have full control over the brand, I wanted to give myself some real type and logo flexibility. As long as the flavor was consistent with my brand, I gave myself the freedom to change up typeface and logo lockups. However, I did start with one primary body typeface (Aerojost) and display font (VoyageCulture) that I could fall back on. It's so freeing to not have to be constrained to one or two typefaces or logos! To manage this balance between consistency and flexibility, I quickly created a brand guide with a long list of usable typefaces into a desktop wallpaper size image.

Since I have full control over the brand, I wanted to give myself some real type and logo flexibility. As long as the flavor was consistent with my brand, I gave myself the freedom to change up typeface and logo lockups. However, I did start with one primary body typeface (Aerojost) and display font (VoyageCulture) that I could fall back on. It's so freeing to not have to be constrained to one or two typefaces or logos! To manage this balance between consistency and flexibility, I quickly created a brand guide with a long list of usable typefaces into a desktop wallpaper size image.

Since I have full control over the brand, I wanted to give myself some real type and logo flexibility. As long as the flavor was consistent with my brand, I gave myself the freedom to change up typeface and logo lockups. However, I did start with one primary body typeface (Aerojost) and display font (VoyageCulture) that I could fall back on. It's so freeing to not have to be constrained to one or two typefaces or logos! To manage this balance between consistency and flexibility, I quickly created a brand guide with a long list of usable typefaces into a desktop wallpaper size image.

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UNCONVENTIONAL, BUT FUN

PROMOTIONAL ITEMS

PROMOTIONAL ITEMS

PROMOTIONAL ITEMS

PROMOTIONAL ITEMS

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MITCH & HIS PLANES: A SHORT HISTORY

MITCH & HIS PLANES: A SHORT HISTORY

MITCH & HIS PLANES: A HISTORY

MITCH & HIS PLANES:
A HISTORY

Since childhood, I've been in love with air and space, learning all I could about the subject. I'd spend hours poring over books, watching documentaries, visiting air museums, attending air shows, building models, and drawing aircraft. And I still do! My first ride in an airplane was when I was 4 years old, and it thrilled and sparked my imagination. In 5th grade I received Grand Prize at the fair for my F-4 Phantom illustration and P-40N Warhawk model diorama! I was also honored to have my B-26 Marauder illustration featured in a kids' magazine.

Since childhood, I've been in love with air and space, learning all I could about the subject. I'd spend hours poring over books, watching documentaries, visiting air museums, attending air shows, building models, and drawing aircraft. And I still do! My first ride in an airplane was when I was 4 years old, and it thrilled and sparked my imagination. In 5th grade I received Grand Prize at the fair for my F-4 Phantom illustration and P-40N Warhawk model diorama! I was also honored to have my B-26 Marauder illustration featured in a kids' magazine.

Since childhood, I've been in love with air and space, learning all I could about the subject. I'd spend hours poring over books, watching documentaries, visiting air museums, attending air shows, building models, and drawing aircraft. And I still do! My first ride in an airplane was when I was 4 years old, and it thrilled and sparked my imagination. In 5th grade I received Grand Prize at the fair for my F-4 Phantom illustration and P-40N Warhawk model diorama! I was also honored to have my B-26 Marauder illustration featured in a kids' magazine.

Since childhood, I've been in love with air and space, learning all I could about the subject. I'd spend hours poring over books, watching documentaries, visiting air museums, attending air shows, building models, and drawing aircraft. And I still do! My first ride in an airplane was when I was 4 years old, and it thrilled and sparked my imagination. In 5th grade I received Grand Prize at the fair for my F-4 Phantom illustration and P-40N Warhawk model diorama! I was also honored to have my B-26 Marauder illustration featured in a kids' magazine.

Since childhood, I've been in love with air and space, learning all I could about the subject. I'd spend hours poring over books, watching documentaries, visiting air museums, attending air shows, building models, and drawing aircraft. And I still do! My first ride in an airplane was when I was 4 years old, and it thrilled and sparked my imagination. In 5th grade I received Grand Prize at the fair for my F-4 Phantom illustration and P-40N Warhawk model diorama! I was also honored to have my B-26 Marauder illustration featured in a kids' magazine.

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THE EARLY YEARS

Work

Aeronaut Design CoSide Business

LOGOMANIALogo Gallery

Personal RebrandBrand Identity

New World PublishingBrand Identity

Specimen BookPersonal Project

TrophyAwardsPromotions - Awards

© Mitch Coppoletti | [email protected]

© Mitch Coppoletti | [email protected]

© Mitch Coppoletti | [email protected]

© Mitch Coppoletti | [email protected]